Tuesday, August 18, 2009

NEW BOOK ON CAHOKIA MOUNDS BY PAUKETAT

I collaborated with Professor Pauketat on Cahokia Mounds for Oxford University Press "Digging for the Past" Series so I'm delighted to report on a new book by the Professor that is making waves.

According to just published Cahokia: Ancient America's Great City on the Mississippi by University of Illinois archaeologist and professor of anthropology Tim Pauketat, the mound builders were not always the idyllic, corn-growing, pottery-making, fishing-hunting gentle villagers depicted in various dioramas at the Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site in Collinsville (Illinois, USA).

Pauketat said these long-vanished people practiced human sacrifice of women and men on a mass scale and weren't always careful to bury only the dead.

Based on years of study of artifacts including many from the extensive excavation of the site's Mound 72 during 1967-71, Pauketat's book is getting national attention.

Ancient Cahokia, which reached its peak about 1150 CE. with a population of 20,000, was a religious center of farmers and hunters that probably influenced much of what archaeologists call the Southeast Ceremonial Complex, a string of similar but smaller sites found from Illinois to northern Florida. About 80 of the original 120
mounds survive, including Monks Mound at the Cahokia site, the largest prehistoric earthen structure north of Mexico.

In this society, often referred to as the Mississippian Culture, women played much more of a role than convenient sacrificial victims, Pauketat said. And even in this death ritual, women were respected, unlike some of the men whose remains were found with heads lopped off.

Ancient Cahokia's big draw, according to the book, was religion. And in the practice of various religious rites, evidence has been found that women were the rivals of this society's male religious leaders.

Pauketat said the evidence is in the form of curious female figurines carved from a type of clay found just south of St. Louis known as flint clay. The reddish substance dries rock hard. Just last month, a small, 4-inch high female figure was found at a state-run archaeological dig in East St. Louis. Pauketat said only 23 other such figurines are known, including the largest, about 16 inches high.

The elevated status of women in religion in Cahokian society is illustrated, Pauketat said, by the decorations on the figurines that include a highly prized serpent figure, and of depictions of staple foods like corn and squash. "Clearly, a lot of the artwork of female gods and female figureheads show that women were probably highly elevated at Cahokia."

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home